Fowlers: A Ubiquitous Tool

Fowlers were the personal firearm of choice for many colonials. They were cheap and versatile, making them ideal for a wide variety of uses. They earned the name "fowler" since they were initially designed for hunting birds, often referred to then as fowl.

Notice on the fowlers below that there is no room to fit a bayonet. Fowlers had many uses, but they were never designed for war.

Flintlock Fowler

Carrying a firearm through the woods becomes tiring after a while. Many weighed up to 10 pounds, and were almost 5 feet tall. Some fowlers were shorter and lighter, making them ideal for transporting for long distances through difficult terrain.

Groce Flintlock Fowler

Colonists liked to put their personal touch on their firearms. While many fowlers, like this one, are fairly plain, those who could afford to often had their fowlers engraved or decorated. However, even cheap fowlers were still given some artful consideration by their creators and owners. 

Groce Flintlock Fowler

Fowlers were used for much more than just hunting birds. They were also used to hunt squirrels, other small game, pests and varmits, and for defense against aggressive animals. As a last resort, they could work for self-defense as well. They could be loaded either with shot--many smaller pellets--or one large ball, depending on the target.

Fowlers: A Ubiquitous Tool