Rifles: The Hunter's Companion

Pennsylvania Rifle

Longrifles were perfect for hunting large game. Their unrivalled accuracy and range gave hunters a large advantage in the backwoods. Rifle owners also participated in shooting matches, where they demonstrated their shooting prowess with feats not unlike William Tell's apple.

Americans also had the option of owning a longrifle. Longrifles were also known as Pennsylvania rifles or Kentucky rifles, and were developed in Pennsylvania. They were tailored to hunting in the backcountry but were often used for sport as well. However, they often cost more than fowlers, and were less versatile. Their small caliber meant they used less powder, which was expensive and hard to get.

Pennsylvania Rifle

Loading a longrifle is a long process. The ball has to be wrapped in a patch to grip the rifling, and forced down the barrel. Americans who bought longrifles were willing to sacrifice speed, durability, and cost in order to gain range and accuracy.

Pennsylvania Rifle

Like fowlers, longrifles were not designed to mount bayonets. Additionally, their long reload time, and constant need to be cleaned, made them even more unsuitable for military use than fowlers.

Rifles: The Hunter's Companion